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Secondary (Years 8 – 12)

Environmental connections

Food webs & Food chains

Year 7

Explore interactions between organisms, the environment and effects of human activities.

Themes: conservation, biodiversity and sustainability

Key Messages:

  • there are many interactions and relationships between organisms and their environment
  • food chains show feeding relationships in a habitat
  • organisms including micro-organism can be classified according to their position in the food chain
  • food webs show relationships between organisms in the environment human activities and introduced species can effect local habitats and species within them. eg deforestation, agriculture, foxes, cats, cane toads
  • living things can change their environment and can impact on other living things
  • we can have a role in caring for the environment and Australian flora and fauna.

Classifying creatures

Year 7

Explore how animals are classified. Investigate how similarities and differences between groups are used to classify animals and help organize the diverse group of organisms.

Themes: conservation and biodiversity

Key Messages:

  • animals can be classified into different groups according to the similarities and differences of particular features.
  • animals are classified to enable identification and communication and are classified using hierarchical systems.
  • animals possess particular forms and functions to help them meet their needs for survival
  • there are a wide range of environments which support a diversity of animals
  • we can all care for the environments that support our animals

Unique Aussie mammals

Year 7

Themes: conservation and biodiversity

Key Messages:

  • mammals can be classified into different groups according to similarities and differences of particular features
  • mammals are classified to enable identification and communication and are classified using hierarchical systems
  • mammals have an important role in a balanced ecosystem
  • mammals possess particular forms and functions to help them meet their needs for survival in a variety of environments
  • we can all care for environments to support mammals

Australia’s vulnerable wildlife

Year 7 -10

Discover the conservation status of Australian wildlife, from common to extinct. Examine the processes threatening their survival and understand how the physical conditions of the environment can impact species survival. Explore some on the ground threatened species programs investigating the innovative approaches taking place.

Themes: conservation, sustainability and biodiversity

Key messages:

  • Australian wildlife has adapted to exist in balance with the natural world.
  • threats and threatening processes including human activity and introduced species create imbalance in natural systems and impact on biodiversity
  • understand the state of Australian wildlife using the status continuum (i.e. common to extinct)
  • we are interconnected with our natural systems, and extinctions and degraded landscapes have impacts on us
  • science knowledge and research collaboration enables us to understand threatening processes and develop technology and programs to implement in response
  • we can reduce our impact on natural systems and wildlife
  • we can assist in environmental conservation and reduce the rate of species loss

Ecosystems

Investigate ecosystems and interconnections between biotic and abiotic components.

Themes: biodiversity, conservation and sustainability

Key messages:

  • communities of interdependent organisms interact with each other and the non-living abiotic components of the environment in an ecosystem.
  • organisms in an ecosystem can interact through predator/prey relationships, competition, pollination and diseases.
  • populations can be affected by introduced species, habitat destruction, seasonal/environmental changes and other factors.
  • energy flows into and out of ecosystems via food webs which needs to be continual to maintain the stability of the system.
  • components in an ecosystems can change due to change in the environment
  • we can assist in caring for biodiversity and ecosystems that support Australian wildlife

Animal adaptations

Investigate how animals have adapted to survive in a variety of Australian terrestrial environments. Discover the structural, physiological and behavioural adaptations of a selection of native animals, including birds, mammals and reptiles.

Themes: sustainability and biodiversity

Key messages:

  • animals have different forms and functions for survival within Australian environments
  • animals have adaptations that help them survive and reproduce
  • animal adaptations can be structural, physiological and behavioural
  • environmental changes lead to modification in animal structure and function
  • we all have a role in caring for the environments that support our Australian species

Cleland as a sustainable tourism destination

Year 11-12- Tourism and sustainability.

Using Cleland as a case-study, examine the factors influencing the sustainability of nature-based tourism, including economic, sociocultural and environmental parameters. Discover the historical evolution of the park as a government operated business and how it has shaped the visitor experience and demographics of those that visit the park.

Themes: conservation and sustainability

Key messages:

  • a balance of environmental, social and economic aspects (triple bottom line) is critical for Cleland to remain sustainable.
  • Cleland and sustainability as a government run business in the context of tourism in wider South Australia.
  • Provision of high quality sustainable engaging visitor experiences encouraging visitors to learn.
  • Importance of the local impacts of the business and role of the marketing.
  • There are career path opportunities available in nature based tourism.

Living on the edge- threatened species

Year 11-12

Discover the scale of species loss since European settlement and consider why species are still under threat or in danger of extinction using the status continuum from common to extinct. Discuss some on the ground threatened species programs and creative approaches and innovations taking place. Think about what sustainable practices we can adopt to assist in the conservation of native animals.

Themes: conservation, sustainability and biodiversity

Key messages:

  • Australian wildlife has adapted to exist in balance with natural systems
  • threats and threatening processes create imbalance and change within natural systems which impacts on all species in the system including us.
  • species are placed according to status on the continuum from common to extinct and legal frameworks exist to protect species and environments.
  • we can actively care for the environment, reduce our impact on natural systems.
  • we can assist in environmental conservation, help our endemic species and reduce the rate of species loss.

Book your education visit.

To find out more, or if you want a Learning program on a topic not included in the list, talk to the Cleland Education Officer.